Enter your Miles College username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Miles College Change your life Apply to Miles College

Social & Behavioral Sciences

Miles Around the World: Cultivating Global Leaders

Take the next step

About

The Miles College Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences acknowledges as its mission the delivery of an academic program in the social sciences, which promotes the development of student competence in the fields of study provided by this Division.

The outcome desired is that of a student educated in the liberal arts, who has developed verbal and critical acumen, diverse cultural perspectives, sensitivity to social issues and technological competence, which prepare him or her for professional growth, career success, quality of living, and community service.

Division Chair: Digambar Mishra, Ph.D.
205-929-1681

Majors

Criminal Justice

The Criminal Justice Program prepares students to be competent compassionate professionals who function knowledgeably in all aspects of the criminal justice system and concomitant fields. The Criminal Justice Program also prepares students for further study in academic and other specialized settings.

CJ 300: Introduction to the Criminal Justice System [Credit Hours: 3] This course teaches criminal justice as a system consisting of interaction between three main components: police, courts and corrections. Its focus is on investigation, arrest, prosecution, trial, conviction, sentencing, incarceration, and community supervision.
CJ 310: Crime and Criminality [Credit Hours: 3] This course teaches students how to analyze causes and impact of crime/delinquency and criminal/delinquent behavior. Prerequisite CJ 300
CJ 320: Criminology [Credit Hours: 3] This course describes theories dealing with both functional and conflict perspectives on crime and criminal behavior. Prerequisite CJ 300
CJ 330: Criminal Justice and Public Policy [Credit Hours: 3] Students will learn about the formation and implementation of public policy; the roles of major governmental institutions in policy-making, and their impact on the criminal justice systems. Prerequisite: CJ 300
CJ 340: Criminal Justice Administration [Credit Hours: 3] This course describes administrative aspects of three main components of the justice system: police, courts, and corrections. It also examines the organization and management of police, judicial, and correctional agencies. Prerequisite CJ 300
CJ 350: Criminal Justice Statistics [Credit Hours: 3] This course introduces statistical methods that emphasize the application of descriptive and inferential techniques to criminal justice data and research. Prerequisite: CJ 300
CJ 360: Criminal Law [Credit Hours: 3] Students will learn about the development of criminal law, elements of criminal offense, types of offenses and defenses, case analysis and legal terminology. Prerequisite: CJ 300
CJ 361: Criminal Evidence [Credit Hours: 3] This course explains the system of rules and standards, state and federal, by which admission of proof at trial is regulated. Prerequisite CJ 300, 360
CJ 370: Criminal Procedure [Credit Hours: 3] Students will learn the process used to convict and punish. They will learn to analyze the legal steps of criminal proceedings, from investigation through punishment. Prerequisites: CJ 300 and CJ 370
CJ 380: Juvenile Delinquency [Credit Hours: 3] This course describes juvenile delinquency in modern society. Students will learn of the nature, scope, causes, treatments, and reaction to juvenile delinquency. They will evaluate various delinquency prevention and diversion programs. Prerequisite: CJ 300
CJ 390: Police Community Relations [Credit Hours: 3] Students will learn about the relationship between the police and the public. The course will focus on problem areas such as crime prevention programs, communications, community participation, and police discretion. Prerequisite: CJ 300
CJ 400: Probation, Pardon, and Parole [Credit Hours: 3] This course explores probation, pardon and parole systems in the United States. It emphasizes pre-sentence investigation, classification, offender selection, supervision and administration. Prerequisite: CJ 300
CJ 410: Criminalistics—an Overview [Credit Hours: 3] Students will explore the relationship between physical sciences and the administration of criminal justice. They will learn about the identification and application of types of physical evidence involving analysis and comparison (laboratory component included). Prerequisites: CJ 300, 361, 370
CJ 410L: Criminalistics—Lab [Credit Hours: 0] Laboratory observations will help students become familiar with the instruments that are used to determine what and how much of an element may be present in a sample of evidence. The knowledge that is gained through the laboratory observations of an AAS, and other machines in use, will provide the students with a working knowledge of how forensic technology is used to quantify heavy and trace metals in forensic samples and how a forensic scientist uses technology to solve crimes.
CJ 420: Constitutional Law [Credit Hours: 3] Learners study constitutional law as it relates to law enforcement. It also includes a study of Supreme Court decisions affecting law enforcement officers, right to counsel, search and seizure, due process, and civil rights. Prerequisite CJ 300
CJ 430: Juvenile Justice [Credit Hours: 3] This course describes specialized agencies and procedures developed to deal with juveniles. It emphasizes the juvenile court system and emerging philosophy. Prerequisites: CJ 300 and CJ 380
CJ 440: Ethics and the Criminal Justice System [Credit Hours: 3] Students explore philosophical questions regarding societal control, crime, and deviance. Topics include criminalization, theories of punishment, exercise of discretion, prediction of behavior, corruption, concepts of justice, and research ethics. Prerequisite CJ 300
CJ 450: Police Administrative Organization and Behavior [Credit Hours: 3] This course presents functional and structural approaches to organization. It includes behavioral study administration, organizations, and individuals. Students will also learn about the effect of group and peer dynamics on decision-making. Prerequisite: CJ 300
CJ 460: Criminal Justice Research Methods [Credit Hours: 3] Students learn about research methods that apply to the field of criminal justice. They learn elementary re- search design and descriptive statistics. This course is designed to enable students to interpret data (e.g., Uniform Crime Reports and demographic studies) commonly used in field. Prerequisites: CJ 300 and CJ 350
CJ 465: Senior Research Seminar [Credit Hours: 1] This course provides supervised experiences in a criminal justice setting. Students will learn to integrate theory with practice while observing criminal justice professionals. Prerequisite: CJ 300
CJ 470: Women in Criminal Justice [Credit Hours: 3] Students will learn about women in criminal justice: women as professionals, women as offenders, and as victims. Prerequisite: CJ 300
CJ 475: Youth Gangs: Violence and Intervention [Credit Hours: 3] This course presents an analysis of youth gang history and describes the characteristics of gang members. It includes gang violence and the effects of youth gangs on society. The theories, practices and various approaches to youth gang intervention are reviewed. Prerequisite: CJ 300
CJ 480: Correctional Laws and Institutions [Credit Hours: 3] This course is a study of prisoner rights, the rights of ex-offenders., and correctional institutions and organizations. Prerequisite: CJ 300
CJ 485: Practicum/Internship in Criminal Justice [Credit Hours: 3] This is a supervised experience in a Criminal Justice setting where students integrate theory, knowledge, and practice. The internship will require a research paper at the end of the semester. 122 clock hours Prerequisite: CJ 300
History

The mission of the History Program is to provide an education of the mind in the rigorous study of history, that will give to students pre-professional skills in historical content, analysis and interpretation and oral and written communication.

HI 101: World Civilizations [Credit Hours: 3] An interdisciplinary approach to the study of world history from prehistoric times, this course examines basic old world cultures of Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas. It emphasizes how such phenomena as nationalism, industrialism, colonialism, cultural diffusion, and international tensions have shaped world cultures.
HI 102: World Civilizations II [Credit Hours: 3] This course approaches world cultures from the standpoint of the twentieth century. It emphasizes the way pre-twentieth century sources have shaped the twentieth century. It also provides a critical examination of such major events as the two world wars, "Third World," anti-colonial revolt, the rise of a "Fourth World" of the have- not nations and the impact of the scientific revolution on world cultures. Study trips abroad may be planned. Prerequisite: HI 101
HI 301: American History I [Credit Hours: 3] This course surveys American history from English colonization to the close of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Prerequisites: HI 101 and HI 102
HI 302: American History II [Credit Hours: 3] This is a survey of American history from 1877 to the present. Prerequisites: HI 101, HI 102 and HI 301
HI 303: Alabama History [Credit Hours: 3] This course deals with the regionalist character of the state and itss s role in American history from the period of colonial settlement to the 20th Century. Prerequisites: HI 301 and HI 302
HI 308: African American History [Credit Hours: 3] This course surveys the role of African Americans in United States history. It emphasizes slavery as well as economic, political, social, and cultural developments. Prerequisites: HI 301 and HI 302
HI 320: Early American History [Credit Hours: 3] This course covers the age of exploration and colonization as well as developments leading to the American Revolution, 1492-1783. It emphasizes the contribution of the era to American political, social and intellectual tradition. Prerequisites: HI 301 and HI 302
HI 321: Nineteenth Century America [Credit Hours: 3] This course examines developments in 19th-century America and their impact on American society and culture. It includes: : the rise of mass democracy and mass entertainments; westward expansion and the Indian Wars; religion and world power; and Romanticism. Prerequisites: HI 301 and HI 302
HI 322: Twentieth Century America [Credit Hours: 3] Students will learn about the causes and course of Progressive era, World War I, post-war isolationism, the New Deal, World War II, Cold War America, the Protest and Civil Rights era, and contemporary history. Prerequisites: HI 301 and HI 302
HI 323: American Urban History [Credit Hours: 3] American Urban History is an examination of the transformation of American cities from the era of the ―walking city‖ to the present. The course will consider urbanization and sub- urbanization, ethnicity and race, economic development, poverty, politics, and federal-city relations. Prerequisites: HI 301 and HI 302
HI 324: Women in Modern America [Credit Hours: 3] This course examines the experiences and contributions of women in twentieth century America. It gives, particular attention to the forces that served to differentiate the opportunities and roles of women from those of their male peers. Prerequisites: HI 301 and HI 302
HI 326: The Civil Rights Movement in America [Credit Hours: 3] This course will examine the events, personalities, and issues of the Civil Rights Movement in America, 1945 to present. Lectures will consider such themes and topics as the origins of segregation, the impact of World War II on the African American community, the life of Martin Luther King Jr., the Montgomery bus boycott, the Freedom Rides, Brown v. Board of Education, Massive Resistance, the White Citizens‘‘ Council movement, ―cultural integration,‖ and the Black Power movement. Prerequisites: HI 301 and HI 302
HI 330: Ancient Europe [Credit Hours: 3] This course provides a survey of Western traditions from the beginnings through the end of the Middle Ages. It emphasizes patterns of thinking and their affects on those institutions most distinctive for the Western tradition. Prerequisites: HI 101 and HI 102
HI 331: Medieval-Early Modern Europe [Credit Hours: 3] Students will learn about European history from the fall of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance. This course will emphasize the literary, artistic, intellectual, religious, and cultural achievements of Renaissance Italy; the rise and growth of Protestantism; and the Catholic reaction; against the background of the economic, political, and social developments in Western Europe. Prerequisites: HI 101 and HI 102
HI 332: Modern Europe [Credit Hours: 3] This course explores European history from the close of the Napoleonic Wars through the two world wars. Particular attention will be paid to Europe‘s pivotal role in world affairs during this period and the factors leading to the nations‘ decline as major global powers. Prerequisites: HI 101 and HI 102
HI 333: European Intellectual History, 1700-Present [Credit Hours: 3] This course is the History of Ideas documenting the Age of Enlightenment of the Eighteenth Century and the French Revolution. It explores the nineteenth century as the Age of ―Isms‖ (including Liberalism, Conservatism, Communism, Romanticism, Idealism, Nationalism, Industrialism, Imperialism, Positivism, Darwinism, and Historicism). It establishes the 20th century as Age of Crisis. Prerequisites: HI 101 and HI 102
HI 341: Latin American History [Credit Hours: 3] This cross-cultural history of Latin America focuses on women, Native Americans, African- Americans, mestizos, and mulattoes in historical context. Prerequisites: HI 101 and HI 102
HI 342: Asian History [Credit Hours: 3] This course introduces political, cultural, and economic history from antiquity to the present. It places special emphasis not only on the study of important Asian kings and leaders but also on the various religions that originated in Asia. Prerequisites: HI 101 and HI102
HI 343: East Asian Civilization [Credit Hours: 3] The course will encompass the histories of China, Japan and Korea, including their defining historical events, beliefs systems, and interactions. It will include the defining religious and philosophical institutions up to modern times. It will examine, in contrast, Japanese and Korean society, institutions and major historical events. Prerequisites: HI 101 and HI 102
HI 350: Thinking and Writing about History [Credit Hours: 3] This course provides advanced training in historical methods and historiography. It emphasizes review of literature of historical inquiry ranging from antiquity to the present and analysis of methodologies, interpretations, values, evidence, and conclusions found in the diversity of historical writings. Prerequisites: HI 301 and HI 302
HI 408: Southern History [Credit Hours: 3] Students will learn about Southern history during the antebellum period. The course emphasizes slavery and race, social structure, Southern identity and values, the road to secession, and Southern distinctiveness before the Civil War. Prerequisites: HI 301, HI 302 and HI 303
HI 412: African History [Credit Hours: 3] This survey course deals with the essential themes of modern African history. It includes such themes as the Berlin conference and partitioning; African diplomacy and resistance to colonial rule; colonial politics in tropical Africa; and the political and economic developments from the last two decades of the nineteenth century to the independence movement in the 1960s.
HI 450: History of the U.S. Foreign Policy [Credit Hours: 3] This course is a chronological survey of American foreign relations in the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed on diplomatic encounters that redefine the role of the United States on the world stage and the rationales that support major foreign policy relations. Prerequisites: HI 301 and HI 302
HI 451: Special Topics – European History [Credit Hours: 3] Special Topics in History focuses on shifting regional and thematic studies that may emphasize an interdisciplinary approach. Subject matter will vary. Subjects covered may include women‘s history, ethnic history, political history, specific regions or countries etc. Prerequisites: HI 301 and HI 302
HI 452: Special Topics – Non-Western History [Credit Hours: 3] Special Topics in History focuses on shifting regional and thematic studies that may emphasize an interdisciplinary approach. Subject matter will vary. Subjects covered may include women‘s history, ethnic history, political history, specific regions or countries etc. Prerequisites: HI 101 and HI 102
HI 453: Special Topics – Comparative History [Credit Hours: 3] Special Topics in History focuses on shifting regional and thematic studies that may emphasize an interdisciplinary approach. Subject matter will vary. Subjects covered may include women‘s history, ethnic history, political history, specific regions or countries etc. Prerequisites : HI 101, HI 102
Political Science

The Political Science Program seeks to instill in its students a lively interest in politics. We offer a comprehensive program that reflects the broad discipline of political science covering major subfields of study: American Government and Politics; Political Ideology and Theory; Quantitative Skills and Scientific Methods; and International Relations and Comparative Politics. Our goals are to make students think analytically and critically, develop an understanding of national and international structures, ideas, diversity, and the quickening pace of globalization.

PS 201: Introduction to American Government [Credit Hours: 3] This introductory course is designed to acquaint the student with the origin, development, structure, and function of the American system of government. Emphasis is placed on the political processes produced by individuals and institutions
PS 300: Introduction to Political Science [Credit Hours: 3] An introduction to the study of conflict and competition for political power, this course focuses on the nature, principles, and limits of political authority.
PS 301: India – Government and Politics [Credit Hours: 3] This introductory course is designed to acquaint the student with the political process in India. It emphasizes federal political institutions.
PS 302: Public Policy [Credit Hours: 3] This course deals with the essential ingredients of American policy making. The major domestic policy areas (e.g. energy, environment, economy and civil rights) are explored. The objectives of those who have been active in shaping policies, including government officials and interested groups, are explained. Prerequisite: PS 201
PS 303: State and Local Governments [Credit Hours: 3] This course examines the nature and background of state and local government units in the United States. It also emphasizes the organization and function of these governmental units. Prerequisite: PS 201
PS 305: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties [Credit Hours: 3] This course attempts to cope primarily with the major problems of maintaining a balance in American society between liberty and order, between diversity and uniformity, and most importantly, between individual rights, and collective needs. Recognizing that the judiciary has become critical in the protection of individual rights, the emphasis will be on court decisions dealing with racial discrimination, free speech, separation of church and state, and the rights of the criminally accused. Prerequisites: PS 201 and PS 300
PS 306: Municipal Government [Credit Hours: 3] A study of local municipalities in the United States, this course explores legal aspects of city government; local election problems; types of municipal government; problems of metropolitan areas, the relationship of Cities to other units of local governments; and problems of city government today. It also considers zoning, planning, housing, revenues, and urban renewals. Prerequisites: PS 201 and PS 303
PS 400: Public Law and Judicial Process [Credit Hours: 3] This course explores the nature of public and private law; the development of the Anglo-American legal system, and the theories of law and jurisprudence. It also considers the American court system, exercise of judicial power, restraints upon courts, the written constitution, and the impact of selected judicial decisions. Prerequisite: PS 201
PS 401: Comparative Government [Credit Hours: 3] This course compares political institutions, processes and practices of various nation- states and selected concepts and ideals which underlie their political systems. Prerequisite: PS 300
PS 403: Non-Western Political Systems [Credit Hours: 3] Torn from today‘s headlines about conflict and conflict resolution, this course is a study of new states. Class discussion examines the successes and failures in the public policies of the newly independent countries of Asia, South Asia, Africa, and Latin America who have thrown off their colonial masters. Prerequisite: PS 300
PS 404: International Relations and Politics [Credit Hours: 3] This study of interactions among sovereign nation-states includes such concepts as balance of power, interdependency, imperialism, neo-colonialism, and ―super‖ powers in a changing political and economic environment. Prerequisite: PS 300
PS 405: Political Ideologies [Credit Hours: 3] This course subjects major political ideologies and major historically interrelated issues to political analysis. It also considers development and change in the major ideologies of the era, including communism, corporatism, fascism, liberalism, and socialism. Prerequisite: PS 300
PS 406: Political Theory [Credit Hours: 3] Students will learn about the philosophical foundations of Western Civilization from Plato to the present. Prerequisite: PS 300
PS 410: Public Administration [Credit Hours: 3] This course is a study of institutions and processes of government administration and management. Prerequisite: PS 201
PS 416: Public Administration Internship [Credit Hours: 3] Students will work a minimum of ten hours a week in a federal, local or state agency or office approved by the instructor. The work will be under the supervision of a member of the agency or office in which the student is placed for a period of 100 hours or ten weeks. During this internship period, the student will attend a three-hour seminar every two weeks to discuss, receive, and disseminate information pertinent to problems and contemporary issues in public administration. Prerequisites: PS 201 and PS 410
Social Work Program

The Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences offers a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree. Students are trained to be generalist practitioners and may choose from a variety of social work electives to pursue their personal practice issues. The mission of the Social Work program is to prepare competent generalist professional social work practitioners who are committed to improving social, economic and political justice and enhancing the quality of well-being of vulnerable individual, families, groups and communities through education, service and leadership with a focus on issues related to African Americans and other diverse populations. The mission of the Social Work program is to prepare competent generalist professional social work practitioners who are committed to improving social, economic and political justice and enhancing the quality of well- being of vulnerable individual, families, groups and communities through education, service and leadership with a focus on issues related to African Americans and other diverse populations. Assessment for Social Work Program 2011-2012Assessment for Social Work Program 2012-2013

SWK 301: Social Work Practice I [Credit Hours: 3] This is a content and laboratory course with learning experiences designed to facilitate the development of professional social work interviewing skills with individuals and families. The course covers engagement, assessment, treatment planning and case recording. NASW code of ethics and theories toward practice will also be examined. Prerequisite: SWK 300, BSW Candidacy
SWK 302: Social Work Practice II [Credit Hours: 3] This is a content and laboratory course designed to train social work students to facilitate groups. The beginning, transitional and ending phases of the group process will be examined. Prerequisite: SWK 300 and SWK 301
SWK 303: Social Work Practice III [Credit Hours: 3] This is a content and laboratory course designed to examine macro social work practice. This course will cover social work practice with large groups, communities and social organizations. Prerequisite: SWK 302
SWK 304: Human Behavior and the Social Environment I [Credit Hours: 3] This course examines the major concepts and theories of the biological, social and psychological development from infancy to adolescence. This course also explores the behavior and development of diverse populations through adolescence. Prerequisite: SWK 300 and BSW Candidacy
SWK 305: Human Behavior and the Social Environment II [Credit Hours: 3] This course examines the major concepts and theories of the biological, social and psychological development from young adulthood through late adulthood. This course also examines the influence of gender roles and sexual orientation in human growth and development. Prerequisite: SWK 304
SWK 306: Social Welfare Policy and Services I [Credit Hours: 3] This course provides an analysis of the historical and philosophical development of social welfare and its relationship to social, political, economic, and cultural institutions. Prerequisite SWK 300 and BSW Candidacy
SWK 307: Social Welfare Policy and Services II [Credit Hours: 3] This course examines social welfare policy development, program analysis, and political and policy advocacy within the generalist social work practice framework. Prerequisite: SWK 306
SWK 308: Child Welfare [Credit Hours: 3] The historical development of child welfare as field of social work practice. Federal, state, and local policies designed to meet the needs of children and their families.
SWK 309: Social Services for Exceptional Children [Credit Hours: 3] This course provides an overview of physical, social, emotional and educational needs of children with developmental disabilities and their families.
SWK 310: Social Work with the Aged [Credit Hours: 3] This course focuses on specific intervention techniques for generalist social work practice with the aged including an overview of theories, program and policies associated with the aging population.
SWK 312: Social Work in the Health Care Settings [Credit Hours: 3] This course is designed for students interested in obtaining an overview of the field of medical social work. It will explore the service rendered by social workers that provide support to those living with physical and mental illness. The role of social workers in several health care settings and in multidisciplinary teams will also be examined.
SWK 313; Substance Abuse [Credit Hours: 3] This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of substance abuse, addiction and its associated theories of causation. Special emphasis will be placed on socio-cultural aspects of alcohol and drug consumption, drug classifications, assessment and diagnosis treatment, relapse and prevention.
SWK 314: Introduction of Mental Health [Credit Hours: 3] Students will obtain knowledge of the theories and research regarding etiology of various mental disorders and the impact of these disorders on the client system.
SWK 315. Introduction to Family Therapy [Credit Hours: 3] This course is an examination of the history of family therapy. It focuses on systems theory and current theories and practice of family therapy. Video, oral and written case presentation will be utilized. Students will learn techniques of family therapy to use with their clients as they practice social work.
SWK 316: Family Violence [Credit Hours: 3] This course will provide the student with knowledge of the types, causes and effects of violence in the home with a focus on intimate partner violence. The student will also examine societal responses to family violence, including medical, legal and treatment responses to these acts.
SWK 317: Social Services for People Living with HIV/AIDS [Credit Hours: 3] This course emphasizes Social Work Practice issues in the provision of HIV/AIDS services.
SWK 319: Social Work with Diverse Populations [Credit Hours: 3] Students receive an in depth introduction into meanings and functions of cultural politics, prejudices, discrimination, racism, sexism, ageism, and oppression.
SWK 410: Applied Social Research [Credit Hours: 3] Application of the research process and proposal formulation for generalist social work practice with individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations. A written research proposal is required. Prerequisites: SS 301 and SS 403
SWK 415: Electric Writing for Generalist Practitioners [Credit Hours: 3] Through didactic and computer instruction, the student will acquire the skills needed to critically analyze and synthesize data given for the purpose of service delivery.
SWK 416: Field Practicum and Seminar I [Credit Hours: 1] This course is the application of social work knowledge, values, ethics and practice principles. It provides experience in social work practice in a community-based agency under supervision and instruction from agency staff. The course involves providing agency services while further developing and enhancing social work practice skills by supplementing and reinforcing classroom learning. Practicum includes spending 250 clock hours in placement. Weekly seminar participation is required. This course is taken concurrently with SWK 303. Prerequisites: BSW Candidacy, Completion of all upper level Social Work courses (with the exception of SWK 303 & 410) and 2.5 GPA
SWK 417: Field Practicum and Seminar II [Credit Hours: 1] This course is the application of social work knowledge, values, ethics and practice principles. It provides experience in social work practice in a community-based agency under supervision and instruction from agency staff. The course involves providing agency services while further developing and enhancing social work practice skills by supplementing and reinforcing classroom learning. Practicum includes spending 250 clock hours in placement. Weekly seminar participation is required. This course is taken concurrently with SWK 410. Prerequisites: SWK 416
International Studies Program (Minor)

The primary mission of the International Studies Program at Miles College is to provide and facilitate international education and activity. The Program‘s objective is the internationalization of the College as a means of cultivating global citizens who will positively help to shape and impact the world. Specifically, the primary foci of the International Studies Program are: to foster internationalization at Miles College; to provide a framework for international curriculum development; to introduce critical world languages; act as an incubator for global critical thought; provide study abroad opportunities for students and faculty; to enable students to communicate, collaborate, and work across national, cultural, and socio-economic boundaries; develop a competent pool of human capital for various entities, to include the government, who are trained in national security areas; host global scholars, international policy-makers, and function as a resource for the sectors of the United States government to retrieve data for developing and implementing federal and international policy.

Faculty

Faculty List - Faculty

Interact

Organizations

Public Policy Leadership Academy The Academy is a conduit for competitively selected students to engage in public policy discourse with both public and private sector decision-makers, to share and discuss solutions to intricate problems related to public interests. Opportunities provided through the Program are both academic and practical in scope. Miles College students who demonstrate a commitment to leadership and who seek to actively contribute to the local, national, and international communities are identified for program participation. Those students who are identified and accepted into the Academy are termed Miles College Public Policy Collegians.
Miles College Intelligence Community Center of Academic Excellence The purpose of the Center of Academic Excellence is to assist students in obtaining careers in the Intelligence Community. Moreover, the Center of Academic Excellence (CAE) is designed to create curriculum with a national security focus for all Miles College students and to increase awareness about the Intelligence Community and its career fields.
Criminal Justice Honors Society Alpha Phi Sigma recognizes academic excellence of Undergraduate and Graduate students of Criminal Justice, as well as Juris Doctorate students. The Goal of Alpha Phi SIgma are to honor and promote academic excellence; community service; educational leadership and unity. Alpha Phi Sigma is the only Criminal Justice Honor Society which is a certified member of The Association of College Honor Societies and affiliated with The Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. As a Student at Miles College of Criminal Justice you have the opportunity to become a member of the Alpha Phi Sigma National Criminal Jusrice Honor Society through the Mu Lambda Chapter here at Miles College. Membership helps student like or own Miles College student distinquish themselves among peers while also speaking to the academic quality that Miles offers. Requirements: 1. Undergraduate student must be enrolled in the institution represented by the chapter 2. Declared a major, minor or equivalent in the criminal justice ore related field 3. Have to had completed three full time semester or its equivalent 4. Have a minimum of GPA of 3.2 on a 4.0 scale