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Natural Sciences & Mathematics

On the cutting edge of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics...

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About

The Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics of Miles College offers an educational program that provides for students from diverse academic, economic, racial, and social backgrounds. The division strives to produce an ethical and intelligent graduate with strong critical and creative thinking skills, quality leadership attributes, competency in a chosen field of study, and a heightened awareness of the importance of research, computer and technological literacy, and a keen knowledge of varied career areas that affect intelligent choices and productive membership in society.

The Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics offers major and minor programs in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Environmental Science, and Computer and Information Sciences. The Division, in conjunction with the Division of Education, offers majors in Biology Education, Chemistry Education and Mathematics Education. The Division also offers a degree in Management Information Sciences in conjunction with the Division of Business and Accounting. The Division conducts programs for students who are interested in attending medical school, dental school or entering the allied health field after graduation. Students completing requirements for these major programs are awarded the Bachelor of Science degree.


Division Chair: Charles Woods, Ph.D.

205-929-1553

Majors

Biology

To provide strong teaching advisement to students majoring in biology and biology education, for employment and or entry into graduate and professional schools.

BY 101: General Biology I [Credit Hours: 3] An introductory course designed to fulfill the general education requirements of the College. Major topics discussed in the course include: the origin of life; the cell, its chemistry, morphology, and differentiation; basic physiology and anatomy of mammals; and basic physiology an anatomy of vascular plants. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week.
BY 201: General Biology II [Credit Hours: 3] Designed to give a stronger background in the biological sciences. The course reviews basic principles presented in BY 101 but on a more detailed level. It covers additional topics receiving major emphasis including the diversity and the interaction of living things with the environment. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BY 101
BY 202: Botany [Credit Hours: 3] The study of growth and development of plants: their microscopic structures, physiology, and diversity, with emphasis on vascular plants. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BY 101
BY 210: Zoology [Credit Hours: 3] The study of the means by which multi-celled organisms solve their peculiar problems of life, principles of classification and phylogenetics, evolution, reproduction, and behavior population. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BY 101
BY 302: Cell Biology [Credit Hours: 3] The cell as a basic unit of life. It covers discussion of the origin of life, classification, genetics, and metabolism leading to an integrated understanding of the relationship between chemistry and biology. It also covers the structure and function of biomolecules, cytoskeletons. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BY 101
BY 304: Genetics [Credit Hours: 3] The fundamental concepts of heredity with emphasizes on the nature, transmission, and action of genetic material. It also involves the study of classical and molecular genetics of plants, animals and microbes. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BY 210
BY 305: Embryology [Credit Hours: 3] A study of the formation, development, and morphology of various animals that emphasizes the human embryo. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BY 210
BY 307: Human Anatomy [Credit Hours: 3] This course is the study of the gross and microscopic structure of the human body, the anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, circulatory, and nervous systems with emphasis on the functional aspects. It involves demonstrations and laboratory study of human tissue and mammalian dissection. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BY 101
BY 308: Parasitology [Credit Hours: 3] This course is an introduction to taxonomy and life cycles of parasites and the pathogenic effect upon their hosts. It uses contemporary experiments as a means of indicating methods of eradicating parasites. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BY 210
BY 310: Histology [Credit Hours: 3] This course includes a detailed microscopic study of cells, tissues, and organs in living organisms. Various histological techniques will be used to augment student understanding of subject matter. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BY 307
BY 317: Immunology [Credit Hours: 3] This course includes a study of the basic principles of immunology. Emphasis is placed on the chemical and physical nature of antigens and antibodies, the mechanisms involved in induction and activity of humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BY 307
BY 402: Human Physiology [Credit Hours: 3] This course involves a study of integrated functions of human cells, tissues, and organ systems -- digestive, reproductive, nervous, and endocrine systems. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 307, or permission of instructor
BY 403: Plant Physiology [Credit Hours: 3] This course involves the study of various processes and structures of plants, photosynthesis, metabolic processes, and plant nutrition. Laboratories and class discussions are integrated to emphasize the relationship between theoretical and experimental results. This also includes independent reading in contemporary areas of research. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BY 202
BY 405: Microbiology [Credit Hours: 3] This course involves the study of microorganisms with emphasis on bacteria, fungi, and viruses; their structure and function; ecology; significance to man and his health; and host defense mechanisms. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BY 210
BY 406: Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering [Credit Hours: 3] This course involves the study of molecular biology of the gene, gene expression and regulation, recombinant DNA, and genetic engineering. It also covers the applications of genetic engineering in medicine and industry. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BY 302 or permission of instructor
BY 407: Biochemistry I [Credit Hours: 3] This course involves a study of the chemistry of carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acid, and lipids, including their structure, function and metabolic interactions. It also covers the study of the chemistry of biological compounds and an introduction to metabolism. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CH 305
BY 408: Biochemistry II [Credit Hours: 3] This course is a continuation of Biochemistry I. It covers metabolism of energy-yielding compounds, oxidative phosphorylation, metabolism of informational molecules; metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids; nutritional biochemistry. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BY 407
BY 449: Senior Seminar [Credit Hours: 1] This course is required of all biology majors in the senior year. This course acquaints students with contemporary research presentations and aids students in preparing for the senior comprehensive examination. Prerequisite: Senior Status
BY 450: Research [Credit Hours: 3] This course involves a research in a specific area of biology under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required
BY 451: Research [Credit Hours: 3] This course involves research in a specific area of biology under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required
Computer Information Systems

The CIS Program provides students with an in-depth education in the conceptual foundations of computer information science and in complex software and hardware systems. It allows student to explore the connections between computer information science and a variety of other disciplines. Combined with a strong education in mathematics, sciences, and the liberal arts it prepares students to be leaders in computer information science practice, applications to other disciplines, and research.

CIS 110: Computer Literacy [Credit Hours: 3] This is a general studies course which emphasizes the influences of the computer in the daily lives of every citizen. It provides a comprehensive overview of the computer; familiarizes the student with the basic terminology in data processing and computer science; introduces concepts of entering, storing, and processing data and its operations; examines the application of computer systems in business, industrial, scientific, and social environments; and prepares the student to understand and utilize computers in his personal and professional life. Students are introduced to word processing, spreadsheet, database, presentation graphics, and personal information management software. Prerequisite: None
CIS 120: Fundamentals of Microcomputer Applications [Credit Hours: 3] Students are provided an intermediate-level treatment of microcomputer software applications. Hands-on experience using word processing, spreadsheet, database, presentation graphics, and personal information management software is gained by applying critical thinking skills to projects simulating life experiences. Prerequisite: CIS 110
CIS 240: Introduction to Microcomputers [Credit Hours: 3] Students learn to use advanced word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation graphics techniques effectively and efficiently Prerequisite: CIS 120
CIS 260: Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems [Credit Hours: 3] This course introduces concepts of computer information systems and the applications of information systems to business. Students learn the basic concepts of computer hardware and software, management information systems, decision support systems, systems analysis, and computer programming. Students develop knowledge and techniques for designing, implementing, and managing various types of information systems, applying word processing, spreadsheet, database, and project management programs. Programming languages and programming techniques will also be introduced and applied to solve case studies. Prerequisite: CIS110.
CIS 270: Microcomputer Hardware [Credit Hours: 4] The course presents learning opportunities for students to recognize and develop expertise understanding hardware components of microcomputers, component interconnectivity, and fundamental systems software. Course activities focus on managing and maintaining personal computer components including the system board, storage devices, and peripheral devices. The credit hours include three lecture hours and one hour and twenty minutes laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CIS 110
CIS 271: Operating Systems [Credit Hours: 4] Operating Systems is the study of basic operating systems concepts with an emphasis on memory, processor, device, and information management. Topics include comparisons of operating systems, how an operating system works with hardware and other software, the boot process and command line, support and installation of operating systems, managing and troubleshooting; and memory management and hard drive support. The credit hours include three lecture hours and one hour and twenty minutes laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CIS 110
CIS 280: Concepts of Multimedia Development [Credit Hours: 3] Students learn how to create multimedia presentations through developing their skills in Web site development, animation, and graphics creation. They also learn how to integrate these skills into a single multimedia presentation. Prerequisite: CIS 110
CIS 290: Introduction to Computer Programming [Credit Hours: 4] This course introduces the principles of computer science by program development in the context C++. Major topics to be covered in this class are: tokens, syntax, semantics, compiling, linking, executing, debugging, variables, types, assignments, inputs, outputs, function definitions, function applications, and conditionals. The credit hours include three lecture hours and one hour and twenty minutes laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CIS 110 and MA 110
CIS 305: Internet Concepts [Credit Hours: 4] This course teaches the most important topics of the Internet. It gives an introduction to the Internet and the World Wide Web. Other topics include browser basics and e-mail basics, search strategies for the Web, information resources on the Web, file transfer protocol, downloading, and data storage. Additionally, the course will build upon these skills and teach advanced e-mail, advanced communication tools, advanced Web topics, and personalized information delivery and electronic commerce. The student will also learn how to create a basic Web page. The credit hours include three lecture hours and one hour and twenty minutes laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CIS 260
CIS 310: Web Site Design and Development [Credit Hours: 3] This course will focus on planning and developing successful Web sites. The student will learn to design good Web sites with functional navigation and efficient organization. Students will create sites using what they learn in class. HTML, XHTML, and XML will be used. Prerequisite: Any programming language course
CIS 320: Introduction to Java Programming [Credit Hours: 4] This course will focus on the main topics of computer science including the design and implementation of algorithms and data structures. Intermediate and advanced concepts of computer programming using the JAVA programming language are covered. The credit hours include three lecture hours and one hour and twenty minutes laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CIS 290
CIS 321: FORTRAN Programming [Credit Hours: 4] This course will focus on the main topics of computer science including the design and implementation of algorithms and data structures. Intermediate and advanced concepts of computer programming using the FORTRAN programming language are covered. The credit hours include three lecture hours and one hour and twenty minutes laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CIS 290
CIS 325: C++ Programming Language [Credit Hours: 4] This class is an introduction to object-oriented programming using the C++ language. The design and implementation of programs using class libraries is explained. Topics include data types, in-line and overloaded functions and operators, class types and members, access and protection of members and friends, constructors and destructors, and streams. The credit hours include three lecture hours and one hour and twenty minutes laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CIS 290
CIS 327: Visual Basic Programming [Credit Hours: 4] This course introduces the student to the concepts and practices of computer programming using one of the easier and more accessible computer language-Visual Basic. Subject studies include variable assignment, hierarchy of arithmetic operations, program editing and debugging, flowcharts, looping, branching, input/output statements, library functions, subroutines, graphics, and strings. The credit hours include three lecture hours and one hour and twenty minutes laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CIS 290
CIS 328: COBOL Programming [Credit Hours: 4] This course combines current COBOL program design and coding techniques with business systems concepts for a practical, thorough introduction to the business information systems environment. Several non-trivial programming assignments will be coded using structured programming techniques. The COBOL syntax is presented within the framework of commonly encountered business-system program models. Concepts are developed step-by-step, proceeding from the simple to the more complex. Each program category introduced builds upon and adds to the knowledge, techniques, and skills developed in the previous model. The credit hours include three lecture hours and one hour and twenty minutes laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CIS 290
CIS 330: Computer Architecture [Credit Hours: 3] This course involves the study of combinational and sequential circuits, arithmetic, logic, and control units, memory system design (cache, primary, secondary), and paging. It also covers ASCII architecture (for a simple computer), different CP cycles (fetch, decode, and execute), implementation of instruction sets by sequences, micro-operations, advances in architecture, introduction to pipelining and multiprocessors. Prerequisite: Any programming language Co-requisite: CIS 333
CIS 333: Assembly Language Programming [Credit Hours: 4] This course involves a detailed analysis of the operation of assemblers. It also covers assembler features, assembly language programming, and macro facilities. Assembly language programs will be written as part of this course. The credit hours include three lecture hours and one hour and twenty minutes laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Any programming language Co-requisite: CIS 330
CIS 340: Computers and Society [Credit Hours: 3] The course introduces models that describe the impact of computers on society and presents tools and techniques that are applicable to problems posed by the social impact of computers. Case studies and environmental scenarios are evaluated and documented. Prerequisite: CIS 110
CIS 350: Project Management [Credit Hours: 4] Students participate in an examination of knowledge sets, skills, tools, and techniques of project management with an emphasis on how project management contributes to the strategic goals of an organization. This course focuses on the role of information technology as an integration tool in project management. Specific topics include Microsoft Project software, work breakdown structure development, resource scheduling, the development of a project network, project organization and time management, performance measurement and evaluation, and managerial competencies required to organize and lead a project. The credit hours include three lecture hours and one hour and twenty minutes laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CS 260 and CS 120
CIS 360: Computer Networks and Data Communication [Credit Hours: 4] This course involves an introduction to basic computer-driven data communications. The protocols, services, interfaces, and platforms for the transmission of data on networks are investigated. The integration of homogeneous and heterogeneous networks is developed: bridges, routers, and gateways. The OSI architecture is defined. The topology of network architecture is covered and the details of connection-oriented and connectionless service, dedicated and switched circuits, access, error detection, and error correction are explained. The credit hours include three lecture hours and one hour and twenty minutes laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CIS 260
CIS 370: Data Structures for Information Systems [Credit Hours: 4] This course involves the study of fundamental data structures and their application in the context of C++. Advanced data structure concepts are developed including paged binary trees, B and B++ trees, hashing, directed graphs, matrices, set manipulation, and finite state machines. Quantitative analysis of algorithms is employed. Advanced sorts and string searches are developed for data manipulation and class libraries implemented for complicated heterogeneous data files like multimedia. Advanced concepts of abstraction with bags and polymorphism are investigated. The credit hours include three lecture hours and one hour and twenty minutes laboratory per week. Prerequisites: MA 324 and CIS 325
CIS 395: Internship [Credit Hours: 4] This course is a practical work experience in computer technology. The course provides the student with practical knowledge of a wide domain of computer hardware, software, and training. Students assist campus information technology staff with various issues, thereby gaining experience with real-world break-fix and problem-resolution scenarios. The credit hours include providing four to five hours per week of IT service. Prerequisites: CIS 270 or CIS 271
CIS 400: Database Management Systems [Credit Hours: 3] Concepts and structures necessary to design and implement a database system are discussed, including logical and physical file organization techniques, data models, network, data integrity, and file security. Topics covered include logical and users‘ viewpoints, theoretical foundations, and physical systems implementation. Prerequisite: CIS 290
CIS 430: Logic Design [Credit Hours: 4] This course will introduce the fundamentals and elements of logic design. The course covers number theory, fundamentals of Boolean algebra, state diagrams, combinational and sequential circuits, and design techniques with logic array components. The credit hours include three lecture hours and one hour and twenty minutes laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CIS 330 and CIS 333
CIS 440: Electronic Commerce [Credit Hours: 3] This course provides both the strategic and technical essentials of what a manager needs to know in order to manage and lead an electronic commerce initiative. In addition, the course examines the use of the Web for the marketing and distribution of goods and services with a focus on assessing the marketing and strategic impact of electronic commerce on areas such as publishing, retailing, entertainment, and travel. Issues such as the Internet, intranets, extranets, portals and search engines, electronic payment systems and security, and electronic commerce servers will be covered. Prerequisite: CIS 260
CIS 449: Senior Seminar [Credit Hours: 1] This course is required of all CIS majors in the senior year. It acquaints students with contemporary research presentations and aids students in preparing for their senior comprehensive examinations.
CIS 450: Information Systems Security [Credit Hours: 3] This course offers an introductory yet thorough treatment of how information is secured in business and industry. Hands-on exercises give students additional opportunities to understand how security breaches occur, which is foundational to understanding how to prevent them. Prerequisite: CIS 360
CIS 451: CIS Research [Credit Hours: 3] This course consists of faculty-supervised research. This course can be repeated three times.
CIS 470: Software Engineering [Credit Hours: 4] This course is an introduction to the process of developing software systems. Topics include software life-cycle models, quality factors, requirements analysis and specification, software design (functional design and object-oriented design), implementation, testing, and management of large software projects. The credit hours include three lecture hours and one hour and twenty minutes laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CIS 370
Environmental Science

The primary mission of the Environmental Sciences Program is to advance, through both classroom instruction and research, the education of students in areas of national and international needs in relation to the environment. Our mission is to use an interdisciplinary approach that ensures that students become aware of a wide range of environmental concerns and that their research includes a breadth of environmental understanding beyond the boundaries of a particular discipline. The ultimate goal of the program is to prepare students for careers in research, management, government service, teaching, and other areas where they can make productive contributions to the solution of environmental problems.

ES105: Introduction to Soil Science [Credit Hours: 3] This course is designed to give basic information to help students appreciate soil as an indispensable natural resource; it teaches how soil can be used and managed for mankind. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week
ES200: Principles of Geology [Credit Hours: 4] This course provides an introduction to geology, with emphasis on geological materials and processes. It also considers historical geology. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BY 101
ES241: Biostatistics [Credit Hours: 3] This is an initial course in mathematics statistics; statistical languages and notations; and describing distributions of measurements, probability, random variance and probability distribution. Prerequisite: MA 111
ES300: Scientific Writing [Credit Hours: 3] This course will teach introduction, organization and graphical presentation of scientific data. Students will be instructed in preparing, writing, and editing for scientific presentations, journals, manuscripts, and reports. Prerequisite: EN 299
ES415: Principles of Bioremediation [Credit Hours: 3] The objective of this course is to introduce students to the applications of bioremediation. Prerequisite: BY 405; sophomore status
ES321: Environmental Science [Credit Hours: 3] This course explores the relationship between individual organisms and their environment; the structure and function of populations, communities, and ecosystems; and computer usage in data analysis and report writing. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BY 101
ES324: Environmental Analysis [Credit Hours: 3] The objective of this course is to expose students to the study of principles and application of chemical and instrumental methods employed in the analysis of soil, water, plant and air samples for environmental purposes. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CH 303 or 304, or special permission from coordinator in consultation with chairperson; junior status.
ES340. Principles Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) [Credit Hours: 3] This course teaches the principles of GPS and GIS, detailing how they are applied in environmental and natural resource inventories and management. Students learn major components of GIS systems such as raster, vector data, data input, verification, spatial analyses and modeling, as well as methods of classification interpolation. Prerequisites: ES-321
ES400: General Ecology [Credit Hours: 4] This course explores relationships between individual organisms and their environment; the structure and function of populations, communities, and ecosystems; and computer usage in data analysis and report writing. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: ES 321, MA 317; written permission of instructor.
ES404: Environmental Laws [Credit Hours: 3] The course is designed to give the student an understanding of government regulations that seek to insure the quality of the environment and the safety of the work place. It includes the study of natural laws and interactions between various species in an ecosystem. Prerequisites: ES 321 and junior standing or permission of the coordinator
ES430: Environmental Science Internship [Credit Hours: 3] The student will work at a remote facility to gain experience in the field. To be eligible for internship, a student must complete all other course requirements in the Environmental Science combined major/minor pattern and apply through the Environmental Science Coordinator for the internship, which lasts approximately eight weeks. The grade is based upon a written report submitted by the student and an evaluation submitted by the Intern Site Director. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the coordinator
ES449: Senior Seminar [Credit Hours: 1] Required of all Environmental Science majors in their senior year, this course acquaints students with contemporary research and presentations as it helps them prepare for their senior comprehensive examinations.
ES450: Research [Credit Hours: 3] Students conduct research in a specific area of environmental science under faculty supervision. Permission of instructor required.
ES451: Research [Credit Hours: 3] Students conduct research in a specific area of environmental science under faculty supervision. Permission of instructor required.
Management Information Systems

The MIS Program provides students with an in-depth education in the uses of computers in business. It allows student to explore both business and information technology and learn how to solve business problems using hardware, operating systems, networking, programming and database management. Students learn to use technology as a key business driver to manage corporate information technology resources.

MIS 120: Fundamentals of Microcomputer Applications [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 120 Fundamentals of Microcomputer Applications is the equivalent to the existing CIS 120 in the Computer and Information Sciences curriculum.
MIS 202: Principles of Microeconomics [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 202 Principles of Microeconomics is equivalent to the existing EC 202 in the Business Administration curriculum.
MIS 211: Principles of Accounting I [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 211 Principles of Accounting I is equivalent to the existing AC 211 in the Business Administration curriculum.
MIS 212: Principles of Accounting II [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 212 Principles of Accounting II is equivalent to the existing AC 212 in the Business Administration curriculum.
MIS 220: Business Math [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 220 Business Math is equivalent to the existing GB 220 in the Business Administration curriculum.
MIS 240: Advanced Microcomputer Concepts [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 240 Advanced Microcomputer Concepts is equivalent to the existing CIS240 in the Computer and Information Systems curriculum.
MIS 260: Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 260 Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems is equivalent to the existing CIS 260 in the Computer and Information Sciences curriculum.
MIS 280: Multimedia Development [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 280 Multimedia Development is equivalent to the existing CIS 280 in the Computer and Information Sciences curriculum.
MIS 290: Introduction to Programming [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 290 Introduction to Programming is equivalent to the existing CIS 290 in the Computer and Information Sciences curriculum.
MIS 302: Business Statistics [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 302 Business Statistics is equivalent to the existing GB 302 in the Business Administration curriculum.
MIS 305: Internet Concepts & Practices [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 305 Internet Concepts & Practices is equivalent to the existing CIS 305 in the Computer and Information Sciences curriculum.
MIS 315: Systems Analysis & Design [Credit Hours: 3] This course enables the students to conceptualize and understand the process of information system definition, analysis, design, and related project management issues. Topics include problem identification, feasibility assessment, requirements analysis, and definition and specification of the planned system conforming to appropriate guidelines and standards. Additionally, individual and group dynamics in the development and implementation process, metrics and tools for analysis, design and project management, quality factors and post-evaluation techniques will be explored. The focus will be on the use of structured analysis and design tools applicable to information systems environments and comparison of various analysis and design techniques. Prerequisite: CIS 260 or MIS 260
MIS 323: Managerial Economics [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 323 Managerial Economics is equivalent to the existing EC 323 in the Business Administration curriculum.
MIS 328: COBOL Programming [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 328 COBOL Programming is equivalent to the existing CIS 328 in the Computer and Information Sciences curriculum.
MIS 340: Principles of Marketing [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 340 Principles of Marketing is equivalent to the existing MT 340 in the Business Administration curriculum.
MIS 345: Computers & Society [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 345 Computers & Society is equivalent to the existing CIS 340 in the Computer and Information Sciences curriculum.
MIS 350: Project Management [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 350 Project Management is equivalent to the existing CIS 350 in the Computer and Information Sciences curriculum.
MIS 360: Computer Networks & Data Communications [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 360 Computer Networks & Data Communications is equivalent to the existing CIS 360 in the Computer and Information Sciences curriculum.
MIS 361: Corporate Finance [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 361 Corporate Finance is equivalent to the existing FI 361 in the Business Administration curriculum.
MIS 381: Principles of Management [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 381 Principles of Management is equivalent to the existing MG 381 in the Business Administration curriculum.
MIS 400: Database Management Systems [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 400 Database Management Systems is equivalent to the existing CIS 400 in the Computer and Information Sciences curriculum.
MIS 402: Strategic Management [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 402 Strategic Management is equivalent to the existing MG 402 in the Business Administration curriculum.
MIS 415: Management Information Systems [Credit Hours: 3] This course covers the planning, designing, development, and implementation of information systems. It also includes theory and application of management information system and issues in information systems, the worldwide web, and the Internet. Prerequisite: MG 381.
MIS 440: Electronic Commerce [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 440 Electronic Commerce is equivalent to the existing CIS 440 in the Computer and Information Sciences curriculum.
MIS 449: Senior Seminar [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 449 Senior Seminar is equivalent to the existing CIS 449 in the Computer and Information Sciences curriculum.
MIS 450: Information Systems Security [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 450 Information Systems Security is equivalent to the existing CIS 450 in the Computer and Information Sciences curriculum.
MIS 451 Business Decisions [Credit Hours: 3] MIS 451 Business Decisions is equivalent to the existing GB 450 in the Business Administration curriculum.
Mathematics

The mission of the mathematics is to provide strong teaching and advisement to students majoring in mathematics and mathematics education, for employment and or entry into graduate and professional schools.

MA099: Basic College Mathematics [Credit Hours: 3] This course is designed to develop a level of mathematical competence and proficiency in preparation for learning mathematical generalizations and abstract reasoning in order to more adequately prepare for daily living requirements.
MA100: Elementary Algebra [Credit Hours: 3] This course is designed to develop the skills, knowledge, and abilities required for success in learning college level algebraic concepts.
MA 101: Intermediate Algebra [Credit Hours: 3] This is a required course in Mathematics for all students. Topics include algebra, equations and their applications, polynomials, factoring, graphs, linear and quadratic equations, and geometry.
MA 110: Pre-Calculus I [Credit Hours: 3] This course introduces the basic concepts of algebra and trigonometry: elementary set theory, the development of real number systems as a complete ordered field, inequalities, absolute values, relations and functions, mathematical induction, and elementary sequences. Prerequisite: MA 101
MA 111: Pre-Calculus II [Credit Hours: 3] This course deals with trigonometry of both a circle and a triangle. It also teaches Trigonometric Identities and Equations and Laws of Sine and Cosine. Prerequisite: MA 110
MA 113 - 114: Arithmetic for Teachers [Credit Hours: 3] This two part course teaches arithmetic operations, percent‘s, algebraic translations, and the metric system. It also introduces geometry. Prerequisite: MA 101
MA 201: Analytic Geometry and Calculus I [Credit Hours: 3] This course deals with coordinates and lines; functions and limits; and differentiation and application. Prerequisite MA 111
MA 202: Analytic Geometry and Calculus II [Credit Hours: 3] Students learn techniques of integration, applications of the definite integral, transcendental functions, sequences and series. Prerequisite: MA 201
MA 203: Analytic Geometry and Calculus III [Credit Hours: 3] This course presents polar coordinates, vectors functions of two or more variables, and multiple integrals. Prerequisite: MA 202
MA 308: Differential Equations [Credit Hours: 3] Students learn the classification of differential equations, first order differential equations, linear second order equations, series solution, Laplace transforms, and systems of equations. Prerequisite: MA 202
MA 311: Linear Algebra [Credit Hours: 3] This course presents vector spaces, matrices and determinants, linear systems, eigenvalues and canonical forms. It introduces numerical methods. Prerequisite: MA 201
MA 315: Theory of Numbers [Credit Hours: 3] This course presents Euclidean Algorithms: fundamental theorem on divisibilities, prime numbers, congruence of numbers; theorems of Fermat, Euler and Wilson; congruence of first and higher degrees; LaGrange‘s theorem with applications: residues; introduction to theory of binary quadratic forms. Prerequisite: MA 202
MA 316: Fundamental Concepts of Algebra [Credit Hours: 3] This is a study of algebraic systems; set truth tables, functions, concepts, inequalities and linear programming, sequences and series. This course does not fulfill any requirements for the Math Major or Minor. Prerequisite: MA 110
MA 317: Probability and Statistics [Credit Hours: 3] This is an initial course in mathematics statistics; statistical languages and notations; describing distributions of measurements; probability; random variance and probability distribution. It is recommended for secondary school teachers and business majors. Prerequisite: MA 111
MA 318: Mathematical Statistics [Credit Hours: 3] This course teaches statistical inference, inference from small samples, linear regression and correlation, analysis of enumerative data, analysis of variances, and non-parametric statistics. Prerequisite: MA 317
MA 319: Fundamental Concepts of Geometry [Credit Hours: 3] This course is primarily designed for Secondary Education majors and will give consideration of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, from both the synthetic and analytical point of view. Prerequisite: MA 110
MA 324: Discrete Mathematics [Credit Hours: 3] This course provides an introduction to the concepts and techniques of discrete mathematical structures that are used in the theory and application of computer science. Topics covered include logic, set theory, relations, functions, recurrence relations, matrices, algebraic structures, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MA 101
MA 351: Numerical Analysis I [Credit Hours: 3] This course provides an introduction to error analysis, computer representation of numbers, bisection, Newton‘s and other methods of root finding interpolation, and least squares approximation. Prerequisite: MA 202
MA 352: Numerical Analysis II [Credit Hours: 3] This course presents numerical integration for differential equations. It introduces numerical methods for different equations and numerical solution of linear systems. Prerequisite: MA 351
MA 403: Advanced Calculus I [Credit Hours: 4] This course presents the algebra of sets, functions, mathematical induction, properties of the real number sequences, limits of functions, and continuity. Prerequisite: MA 203
MA 404: Advanced Calculus II [Credit Hours: 4] Students learn differentiation, integrations and integrability; sequences of functions, infinite series, and topology of the real line. Prerequisite: MA 403
MA 412: Complex Variables [Credit Hours: 3] This course presents complex numbers; elementary functions; differentiation and integration; analytic functions; Cauchy‘s theorem; infinite series, and residues. Prerequisite: MA 404 or permission of instructor
MA 421: Introduction to Abstract Algebra [Credit Hours: 3] This course teaches basic terminology, elementary set theory, integer arithmetic, mappings and operations, introduction to groups, rings, fields, and equivalence relations. Prerequisite: MA 202
MA 449: Senior Seminar [Credit Hours: 1] Required of all Mathematics majors in the senior year, this course is intended to acquaint students with contemporary research and presentations as it helps them to prepare for their senior comprehensive examinations.
MA 450: Research [Credit Hours: 3] Students conduct research in Mathematics under faculty supervision. Permission of instructor required
MA 451: Research II [Credit Hours: 3] Students conduct research in a specific area of Mathematics under faculty supervision. Permission of instructor required.
Chemistry

The Chemistry program at Miles College provide quality education through teaching, learning and research. The program offers chemistry core courses and electives enabling students to excel in the areas of chemistry they are planning to specialize. A well-rounded curriculum at Miles College will enable students to attain an in-depth knowledge of chemistry and chemistry graduates choose various chemistry related careers. With a solid foundation in chemistry, graduates use their degrees to purse advanced study in chemistry as well as for study in engineering, medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, forensic science, materials science, environmental science, medical technology, physical therapy, patent or environmental law and education.

CH 110: Chemical Concepts [Credit Hours: 3] This course is an introductory course for Natural Science majors. Chemical Concepts covers all the fundamentals in chemistry. Factor analysis, unit conversions, periodic properties of matter, balancing chemical reactions, reaction stoichiometery, energetics involved in reactions, and fundamental organic chemistry are taught in this course. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week
CH 131 and CH 132: General Chemistry I and II [Credit Hours: 3] Chemical reactivity, molecular structure and bonding will be discussed in detail in the General Chemistry sequence. Common types of reactions, reaction stoichiometry, reactions in aqueous solutions, redox reactions, and the energy involved in reactions, and factors that affect speed of chemical reactions will be taught in detail. Chemical equilibrium pertaining to solubility, precipitation reactions and acid base reactions are also covered in these courses. The fundamental ideas and method that are basis of all chemistry that includes atomic structure, periodic properties of elements, bonding and molecular structure will be introduced in these courses. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CH 110, MA 101
CH 303 and CH 304: Qualitative Analysis and Analytical Chemistry [Credit Hours: 3] The analytical sequence of chemistry courses with strong emphasis on laboratory work, involves quantification of compounds using various analytical techniques of separation and identification. Main steps involved in complete analysis, like sampling, sample preparation, measurement and calculation, in each method will be introduced. The wet chemical methods covered include titrimetric methods, acid-base equilibria, complex formation titrations, oxidation-reduction titrations and electrochemical methods of analysis. Spectrophotometric, chromatographic, light absorption, transmission and scattering techniques used in analysis will be discussed in detail during the course. The operation of main instruments routinely used in analytical laboratories for hyphenated methods of analysis will be covered in the courses. Three lecture hours and a three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites CH 131, CH 132, and MA 110
CH 305 and CH 306: Organic Chemistry I and II [Credit Hours: 3] Structure and reactivity of six main classes of organic compounds: alkanes, alkenes, alkadienes, alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols and aromatic compounds will be taught in detail in this two semester sequence of organic chemistry. Nomenclature, preparation and reactivity of the above classes of compounds with different functional groups like carbonyl, ether, carboxyl, ester and amino groups will be discussed in detail. A mechanistic approach to organic reactions with emphasis on stereochemistry is an essential component of these courses. These courses are supported by laboratory work that includes use of chemical instrumentations like Infrared spectrometry, Gas Chromatography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Three lecture hours and a three hours laboratory per week. Pre-requisites: CH 131, 132
CH 350: Instrumentation Techniques [Credit Hours: 3] 'Instrumentation Technique‘ is an advanced course that builds up on qualitative analysis (CH 303) and analytical chemistry (CH 304). Advanced instrumentation techniques used routinely in environmental, pharmaceutical, biochemical, material science, forensic and surface science laboratories will be taught in this course. In addition to the electrochemical, chromatographic, spectrophotometric, nuclear magnetic methods used in instrumentation, surface analytical techniques using light/electron beam scattering will be dealt with in this course. Pharmaceutical analysis using radioisotopes, use of nanotechnology in instrumentation, immunoassays and material characterization will be highlighted. The students will be able to design a specific methodology to carry out an analysis highlighting method validation, and other quality control criteria. A tour of a state-of-the-art instrumentation laboratory is included in the course. Three lecture hours and a three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CH 303 and CH 304
CH 407: Synthetic Organic Chemistry [Credit Hours: 3] A mechanistic approach to organic chemistry, synthetic organic chemistry is an advanced level organic chemistry course for students majoring in chemistry. Different multi-step synthetic methods pertaining to natural products, drugs, pharmaceuticals, dyes and fine chemicals, organic polymers, food and beverage flavoring will be taught in this course. Pertinent mechanisms involved in esterification, electrophilic aromatic substitutions in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons etc., will be discussed during the course. A special project will be assigned in which students are required to plan a multi-step synthesis of a pharmaceutical preparation and conduct literature survey on the compound. The students will design a multi-step synthetic route for the compound and execute the process in the laboratory. Three lecture hours and a two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CH 305 and CH 306
CH 401 and 402: Physical Chemistry I and Physical Chemistry II [Credit Hours: 3] This two semester sequence of physical chemistry for students majoring in chemistry emphasizes varied topics in physical chemistry with coherent laboratory work. The first part of this course will deal with the chemical system at the microscopic level. With a brief introduction to advanced mathematics and differential calculus, the basic principles underlying physical chemistry will be taught. Basic thermodynamics, that includes defining a system, energy production, utilization, Carnot cycle, thermodynamic properties of system, steady-state and equilibrium state, first and second law of thermodynamics will also be taught. The main portions of thermodynamics that include reaction equilibrium in ideal gas mixtures, one and two component systems and real gases will be taught in detail. During the second half of physical chemistry, solutions and their behavior, non-ideal solutions, reaction equilibrium, multi-component phase equilibrium, surface chemistry, electrochemical systems, kinetic theory of gases, reaction kinetics and quantum chemistry will be covered. The areas of chemical physics with applications in spectroscopy will also be dealt with during the second part of the physical chemistry course. Three lecture hours and a three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CH 131, CH 132, MA 110, and MA 111
CH 449. Senior Seminar [Credit Hours: 1] This course is required of all Chemistry majors in the senior year. It acquaints students with contemporary research, presentations and aids students in preparing for their senior comprehensive examinations. Prerequisite: Senior Standing
CH 450 and 451: Research I and II [Credit Hours: 3] This course involves reading and laboratory work on special topic in chemistry or related field, under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required
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